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30.9.12

Our Cornwall

Cornwall Council are planning another huge jump in the population of Cornwall over the next 20 years. Join us and oppose their plans to re-shape our land.. 

It's Our Cornwall is a site dedicated to safeguarding Cornwall's environment and defending its Cornishness. It stems from the dismay and frustration felt at the suburbanisation of Cornwall that has steamrollered over us since the 1960s. Its first aim is to encourage as many Cornish residents as possible to make their views known in Cornwall Council's Core Strategy/Local Plan consultation. (This page has been initiated by one of the authors of Cornwall at the Crossroads, published by the Cornish Social and Economic Research Group in 1989.)

 General information Twenty years ago in Cornwall at the Crossroads we called for a breathing space so that Cornwall and its communities could take stock and plan for a properly sustainable future. Yet high rates of housing and population growth carried on and since 2009 growth pressures in Cornwall have moved up a gear. Local groups have been fighting plans for large building projects from Camborne to Saltash. 

Now, even though the rate of population growth has slowed down since the 1980s, Cornwall Council want to push it back up again. Since the 1960s the population of Cornwall has grown by 56%. Yet the Council is planning another 48,000 to 60,000 houses dotted around Cornwall. In just 20 years. Over two thirds of these new houses are not needed for local people but will go to in-migrants or be bought as second homes. 

This will increase the built-up area of Cornwall by over 20% in just 20 years. A stable population policy aimed at local needs while still permitting 80% of current in-migration would require less than 13,000 new houses. 

The long-term consequences of such a rate of growth are nothing short of catastrophic. Acres of countryside will be lost, traffic congestion will get even worse, our natural resources will be irresponsibly consumed. And the current population of 532,000 - up from 340,000 in 1961 - will be verging on a million by the end of the century. Twice the current numbers and more than twice the present built-up area! This is the bleak future our Council is planning for us. 

This insane agenda has to be halted. A policy of population-led growth has been pursued since the 1960s. It has failed - economically, environmentally and culturally. But our politicians only promise more of the same inappropriate and unsustainable growth. 

It's surely time to say we've had enough. Local people feel they have little say in the future of Cornwall. The Council is committed to a strategy of housing growth that mortgages our future to serve the interests of up-country developers, large construction companies, landowners and supermarkets. Developer-led growth has to be replaced by democratic development, restoring to the people of Cornwall a sense of ownership over the future of our land. 

Click here for the Our Cornwall Facebook page. 

22.9.12

To keep your Human Rights and obtain Cornish Rights!


Click on the link above and you'll have the chance support Human Rights in the UK as well as a space to call for Cornish rights. 

18.9.12

When the Cornish pound?

16.9.12

All Catalan now.

We are Catalan and we want independence!


Here's another image of multiculturalism in action that will have both far-right thugs and cynical state-nationalists choking on their cereal I hope.

Stateless nations, in this instance Catalonia, can welcome immigrants and their descendants as parts of their diverse societies. This is an image that simply will not compute in the minds of various 'anti-fascist' organisations so intimately bound as they are to the state-nationalisms (imperialisms) of previous centuries.  

Our Cornish, Scottish and Welsh societies and identities can be as welcoming and open as Britishness or Englishness, tainted as they are by previous centuries of imperialism and cultural supremacism. It's our choice. Don't let anybody, certainly not British state-nationalists, try and tell you otherwise. They are playing a cynical game of faux anti-racism fuelled by British nationalism.

Below is a blog on a similar theme from the Breton Connection.




Now that's multicultural for you. An interview in a national minority language (Breton) about a traditional music event with a couple of black musicians wiping the floor with the competition in the background. 

Not the kind of thing you'd find on the websites of the various anti-fascist state-nationalist organisations that seem to be two-a-penny in the UK, France, Spain etc. 

In their defence of the old imperialist states - institutionally intolerant of their original national minorities as well as any other minority group that menaces the establishments hold on power - these anti-racist organisations seem at times more part of the problem than any kind of solution.

14.9.12

Learning Breton

For anybody interested in hearing some spoken Breton (Brezhoneg) then below you'll find a pretty dam good example. 


Breton is the closet relative of the Cornish language and equally shares much with Welsh. I believe 80% of basic vocabulary is shared between Cornish and Breton. 

If you'd like to learn Breton then this blog has plenty of links to useful sites. Of course speaking French will help in accessing the vast majority of learning materials. However, that being said, some organisations have translated their websites into English. Equally, in my experience, the level of spoken English amongst Breton language trainers is above that of the 'French' average.

Finally, if you are an anglophone and you want to learn some Breton don't hesitate to contact me for some advice.

Learning Breton

For anybody interested in hearing some spoken Breton (Brezhoneg) then below you'll find a pretty dam good example. 


Breton is the closet relative of the Cornish language and equally shares much with Welsh. I believe 80% of basic vocabulary is shared between Cornish and Breton. 

If you'd like to learn Breton then this blog has plenty of links to useful sites. Of course speaking French will help in accessing the vast majority of learning materials. However, that being said, some organisations have translated their websites into English. Equally, in my experience, the level of spoken English amongst Breton language trainers is above that of the 'French' average.

Finally, if you are an anglophone and you want to learn some Breton don't hesitate to contact me for some advice.

2.9.12

Cornwall's MP's 1812 - 2012 compared